PROFESSIONAL PATH

PROFESSIONAL PATH

A brief and visually helpful timeline style walk through of my work experience...

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SKILLS, TALENTS, AND ABILITIES

SKILLS, TALENTS, AND ABILITIES

Showing determination in the face of fear makes us extraordinary. Wow, that's deep but hey, check out some of these awesome skills...

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MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE

MESSAGE IN A BOTTLE

Yo, ho! There be rough waters ahead. Ye Scallywags best be tossin' a bottle overboard! Hurry now! Send out the S.O.S....

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Homepage / Professional

Reading Time: 3 minutes When applying for employment, I do not always look at the specific “job title” as much as I look at the totality of circumstances which would comprise the position. To me, the totality of circumstances includes important elements such as: the nature of business, location, and environment (among other factors). All of this helps me when I am scouting for future employers as well as whether I genuinely believe I could do the work of the position for which I am applying (and do it well). I do not have the job title of every position I am applying for. This is partly because many job titles are new to the market all together so it would be impossible for anyone to have worked under that job title. The other component is that I have the skills, experience, and ability to do all of the tasks listed in the description, just no formal work under that title (yet). To better understand what I mean, some of the job titles I am speaking of include: Knowledge Manager Human Satisfaction Manager Product Owner Engagement Manager Solutions Architect Solutions Consultant Cloud Architect Another issue has been (even with older job titles), when I apply for a position, say a “graphic artist”, a superficial glance of my resume shows that I do not have “graphic artist” listed as a job title. This has caused some issues, which is why I wanted to address that in this article. So, let’s break down what I’m talking about. Take the job title of “graphic artist”, I do not have the (literal) “work experience” of a “graphic artist” (job title) on my resume. Nevertheless, a closer look at the job duties, of any “graphic artist” position reveals that I have done the work of that job title for years (Figure 1). Figure 1. Venn Diagram of experience and job descriptions. In my experience, I have seen managers and business owners who become distracted with titles/descriptions and I believe this is a harmful approach because it forces employees into boxes. I am more team-oriented than titles and I believe that many of the “job description” elements found within job titles fall right in line with my training, education, and experience. With each skill set I have, there are the accompanying tasks which may be accomplished using them, regardless of the job title. Below, I have put together a search tool that allows you to type in a job title to see the applicable resume which matches that job. I have not listed every possible job title that exists or may one day exist; I have only put the job titles I am actively applying for. So, if you are an employer, type in the job title you are considering me for!     Learn More About Me: My Professional Experience Timeline   My Personality Type   A complete list of all employment worked from 1993 until… Learn More… With their strong sense of intuition and emotional understanding, INFJs can be… Learn More…

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Reading Time: 2 minutes Having worked in the IT field for over 10 years, I resonated with Moira Alexander, of Chief Information Officer (CIO.com), a subsidiary of International Data Group (IDG), in her article titled Project management guide: Tips, strategies, best practices , when she listed the following as reasons IT projects fail: Misalignment between project goals and business strategy Unrealistic project scope or scope that is not closely controlled Vague business goals or requirements The remaining items Alexander listed in her article may have relevance to others but for me, these jumped out at me. Misalignment has occurred with me when management is afraid to set boundaries with clients. In software development you wireframe out all aspects of development but when managers meet with clients and let too much input enter the development process it mucks up the waters. Often times, it is because clients do not understand what all goes into programming software yet want to reserve the right to randomly add in a feature that may take months or even years to produce. Features included in software must be very specific, realistic, and useful or you have a bad end product. When someone doesn’t understand what goes into software they begin listing off features they’ve seen in movies or heard about in a tech magazine. The truth is, when you imagine something “cool” (like unnecessary window slide-in transition in RMS software) in the middle of production you effectively cancel the working contract, as well as the previous production schedule, and must reenter into the negotiation stage so you may rework the entire contract to include the given “cool” add-on. Clients become endlessly offended and have the “Why can’t you just add in anti-gravity while you’re at it?” attitude when it’s simply not a possible feature you can include and satisfy the terms of the contract (budget, time, etc.). However, when you have a manager that fails to relay this information to the client you immediately have unrealistic project scope. Vague business goals (or requirements) has happened with me when the client was given too much opportunity to change their mind about features offered. When contracts are signed for software they stand as the diecast from which all production will come from. If at any point the model (or cast) is changed, the entire contract must be rewritten to establish a new diecast from which software may be generated. In short, I completely agree with the items listed in this article. I have personally experienced setbacks and they did specifically include these three (3) items listed.

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Reading Time: 3 minutes Reflection of Light   The Interest I was playing a game of chess 2D style on a tablet and it just seemed so 1980’s. While thinking of my next move the wheels in my head began turning and I started to think that there has to be another way to make this game more robust. If I took what I already know about programming could I make a program that was truly 3D? Probably not, right? Well, maybe, just maybe I could… Considering the following: R = IR / II and T = IT / II Where R + T = 1 Granted, this is nothing more than technically describing what we see when light transmits or reflects off of the given surface but it still led me to think that everything that we see is nothing more than what we think we see because we are slaves to our visual ports. Could we not then use a bit of optic tricks and tell our brains that we are seeing something that may or may not be there? I’m thinking so but it will take a bit more work to properly bring this idea to fruition. Consider the idea that light is really nothing more than what we (or our minds) make of it. Again, referencing to the video above, if someone is color blind then what they witness is limited by their faculties. Therefore, if we can fool our sensory gates into seeing in 3D than 3D does exist. The trick is utilizing optics to our advantage. After taking apart numerous devices which utilize lasers I have been working on the math which is giving way to the theory of a self-terminating beam which will give the illusion of a termination point in space. Thus, providing to the viewer that a “wall” or viewing screen is there when in reality it is not. Much of the basis for this is utilizing a series of lasers to cancel out the signals at a point of intersection which gives way to the viewing screen effect. With this hypothesis statement being made now comes the fun part of trying to get these things to really happen. Like the old saying, “After all that’s said and done there’s a lot more said than done.” I think a bit of rolling up the shirt sleeves would be in order. If we apply the priciple of superposition when the two laser beams meet a stationary wave is formed. This is because of the nodes and anti nodes. The nodes are like points when there is zero vertical displacement of light while anti nodes occur when there are four times the intensity of a normal laser. Laser talk can blab on forever about it’s properties and such but more to the point really is that you can only have time-averaged cancellation if the two waves are traveling in the same direction. If the waves are traveling at angles, they will continue on unaffected after passing each other. You can only have time-averaged, overall cancellation (as opposed to transient, instantaneous cancellation at specific points in time and/or space) if the waves are 180 degrees out of phase at all times. However, this is not possible for waves traveling in different directions. The waves might be perfectly out of phase at a frozen moment in time: Utlimately, when two lasers meet at one point (no matter what the angle 180, 90, 45, etc) it doesn’t do much to the naked eye. However, when matter is present at the crossing point, very interesting effects can happen, especially if we’re talking about femtosecond pulses meeting in a non-linear crystal. For the purposes of my experiement I will be using various materials at the point of intersection to create various 3D affects. I have worked on a lot more than what is on this page but this does communicate the basic heuristic. As time moves forward I will continue to put more information on this page as I complete the given phases of my project/experiement, then I will make those things a bit more presentable and then I will post them here in some sort of video format, tutorial or the like.   Summary of Downloads & Extra Links Getting Help The Principle of Holographs My Project Downloads Definition of holograph Links I found Helpful Holograms and their Applications Great Laser Saftey Tips

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Reading Time: 1 minute Background This project began because of a few factors. One of the big factors was that I have two small boys at the house. My wife mentioned to me that I should keep my office door locked so the boys don’t get in the office and get hurt on something in there. So, my goal was to come up with a techy way to lock the office and keep things consistant with my nerdy inventor theme. When I was about 10 I remember Star Trek The Next Generation (TNG) was one of my favorite shows and my fondness was actually kick started again by a fellow co-worker of mine. He would bring his Star Trek DVD’s to work and on some nights he would come to work dressed in his full Star Trek uniform! At first that seems really funny but he was very intelligent and I never minded having a conversation with him. As time went on I thought it would be a kick to skin my security touch-pad door system using the TNG look, style and feel. My research for artistic insight got me watching the show again and I had a lot of fun revisiting some childhood moments. I was able to capture the TNG skin for my door panel and so I know have a TNG door touch-pad locking the office!   Summary of Downloads & Extra Links   Helpful links Adge’s Star Trek LCARS Terminal Page LCARS DesktopX Theme LCARS X32 View the LCARS code on Github

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Reading Time: 2 minutes Getting anything done for free these days takes a bit of working. Lets follow some steps to see if what worked for me can work for you as well. Step 1. Power your phone up and act like you are going to make a call. Type in *#06# your IMEI number will appear on the screen. Copy that down somewhere.   Step 2. You need to retrieve your BlackBerry device’s MEP code. To do this you need to open up your “OS Engineering Screen”. On the main menu screen of your BlackBerry press down ATL+Shift+H (for help) at the same time.   Step 3. Go to OS Engineering Screens > Device Info.   Step 4. Scroll down under the SW Parts List and you will find your MEP. In my case it was MEP-04104-007. Take this number down. You will need it.   Step 5. Download this BlackBerry MEP generator and fire it up. You simply select from the drop down menu which MEP you have (such as mine above MEP-04104-007 from steps 2 – 4) then you type in your IMEI number in the appropriate textbox and click on “Calculate”.   Step 6. Back to your BlackBerry’s main menu screen go to Options > Device > Advanced System Settings > SIM Card.   Step 7. Type in MEPD. No typing will appear on the screen as you do this. Once that is typed your screen list will expand and you will be able to see the following (or similar): Personalization: SIM Network Network Subset Service Provider Corporate Each of these settings in the phone represent a Mobile Equipment Personalization (MEP). Each of these can be locked and if that’s the case you will have to select each one and unlock them. Your unlock code will be between 10 and 16 numbers long. For better clarification, the above is what you will see along with whether it is active or disabled. Like so: Personalization: SIMDisabled NetworkActive Network SubsetDisabled Service ProviderDisabled CorporateDisabled The “Active” and “Disabled” are not bolded on your phone as they are all smooshed into the other word. You will understand once you see it on your screen. Please note, each of the five personalizations are a different MEP. For instance, Personalization: MEP1 = SIMDisabled MEP2 = NetworkActive MEP3 = Network SubsetDisabled MEP4 = Service ProviderDisabled MEP5 = CorporateDisabled Each phone has 5 MEP’s that can be locked. In my case, T-Mobile only locked MEP2 and so I only needed to input the 1 code which unlocked the phone.   Step 8. Now from your MEP generator you can select one of the MEP codes that match what is Actively locked. For instance, the following codes is what will be presented in your generator screen: IMEI: 353039043459297 MEP: MEP_04104_007 ————————– MEP Codes: MEP1 :4486467426976036 MEP2 :7603376453602214 MEP3 :1577369485260306 MEP4 :8051453218862502 MEP5 :7845777045561355 ————————– Codes Successfully Done. So if MEP2 = NetworkActive is what is locked or showing active on your phone, you would select MEP2 :7603376453602214 from the generator as your code to enter.   CAUTION: BlackBerry only allows you to try a MEP code up to 10 times and then it will permanently lock on you and you will not be able to unlock that phone. Please make sure you type things in correctly. Step 9. To input your code scroll over the MEP you wish to unlock and type in MEP2 or the letters M E P and then the number 2 (alt+e). This will bring up the screen for you to place your MEP code. It should display that the code was accepted and you’re go to go! Enjoy your unlocked phone.

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